7 Most Common Mistakes Made By Badminton Players

7 Most Common Mistakes Made By Badminton Players

7 Most Common Mistakes Made By Badminton Players

Imagine this analogy. There are two badminton players, you and a friend. While you play the racquet sport to break the monotony of busy life and regain physical and mental health, your friend has some professional aspirations. Notwithstanding the end objectives, both require to ward off certain mistakes that most patrons of the sport fall prey to. Nobody is perfect, but you can always make efforts to do away with your vulnerabilities and achieve perfection. Because it is the quest for perfection that will help you and your friend keep up with individual goals and sustain the passion for badminton over a period. So, we are here to help you and your friend kick start the journey to perfection with an elaboration of 7 commonest pitfalls to avoid.

Ignoring Footwork

Ignoring Footwork

In badminton, you serve it, hustle it, and smash it. To execute any of it, you need correct postures, optimal balance and nimble footwork. In case you are yet to acquire the ability to hit the backhand whilst in mid-air, the footwork becomes imperative to generate the required power. However, many players either ignore footwork training outright or go easy on it. If you and/or your friend are committing the same folly, it’s time to mend ways. Both need to sweat it out on the court and off it as well to acquire agile and strong legs that can help in implementing moves and getting the better of the opponent. Your friend may require specialised agility training and tools, while rope skipping, cycling and running may suffice for you.

Wrong Grip

Wrong Grip

Grip on the racquet invariably determines the velocity and direction of the shot. Right grip for right outcome – it’s as simple as that. Surprisingly, even many professionals, let alone hobbyists, err in gripping the racquet and often end up paying for it. With a faulty grip, the shuttle, especially in a power shot, fails to land in the intended place at the intended speed, making it easy to pick for the opponent. Many prefer a bevel grip for backhand and a panhandle grip for forehand, which takes a toll on their power and impact the shot performance. Obviously, whether it’s you or your friend, getting the grip right is crucial for both. Here, practice is the only way to perfect a perfect grip for a perfect backhand, forehand or serve.

Inaccurate body position

Inaccurate body position

Many badminton enthusiasts are prone to inaccurate body positions that often lead to their undoing. If the body position is not right, your serves smash and deft returns will miss the sting. Many have the tendency of getting on to the side and not fully turning the shoulder to hit clear a backhand. Here, the racquet travels a wrong trajectory when meeting the shuttle, leading to a faulty shot performance. This can be avoided with a little awareness and a lot of practice. Since your friend is training on professional lines, he might have coaches to help with his body positions. While, on the other hand, you may be devoid of any such luxury, which calls for studying the players on the court and on videos to learn correct position strategies.

Faulty Serves

Faulty Serves

Serves are central to badminton with 40% of the game depending on them. Still, a majority of players are given to faulty serves that are likely to ruin their chances. They are unable to make the shuttle land in the right place, which is crucial for starting a rally. Illegal serving is also a norm, particularly among amateurs. Any forehand or backhand serve made from above the permissible height is proclaimed illegal in professional badminton circuits. As such, you can get away with faulty or illegal serves but not your friend aspiring to participate in a competitive event. Rectifying your serves takes a consistent effort, it is important nonetheless.

Inappropriate Racquet

Inappropriate Racquet

A racquet is to a badminton player what sword used to be for a soldier back in the day. It is an instrument that does all the talking on the player’s behalf and commands the opposition into submission. When stakes are this high, being wrong with your racquets is not an option for you or your friend. That said, there are many out there, hobbyist and professionals alike, who neglect the racquet’s weight or its string tension. Resultantly, they are vulnerable to long losing steaks and even injuries. In fact, heavy racquets strain the shoulder muscles and tendons, which often translate into career-threatening injuries. Also, your ability to make the right serves and returns takes a beating if the racquet is heavy or string tension is high.

No warm-ups

No warm-ups

In almost all professional setups a dynamic warm up is mandatory prior to the game, while amateurs often neglect it. Apparently, they enter the court with stiff muscles that play a spoilsport in more ways than one. The stiff muscles not only restrict the player’s movement and shot-making but may expose him to injuries as well. These adversities can be kept at bay with light, simple warm-up exercises, including stretching, push-ups and more. Just swing your arms and rotate your knees and ankles repeatedly, and help yourself to relaxed muscles and a lively performance on the court. However, your friend may be doing some specialised stuff.

Over smashing

Over smashing

Badminton players often misconstrue smashing to be the sole opportunity to bamboozle the opponent and earn points. The misconception is so deep-rooted that players often pounce on the slightest of opportunities to smash the shuttle with all their might. No denying the fact that smashes often fetch the desired results but they have their share of drawbacks. A smash takes a considerable toll on the player’s energy, leaving him depleted when it matters the most. Plus, the player may also lose his balance, wrist position and ability to place the shuttle, and hence, end up conceding points. So, prudence is always recommended when it comes to smashes.

HOPOUT

HOPOUT is a growing online community for anyone with aspirations for exploring a new hobby or revisiting the one long-lost one. Looking out for badminton players near you, download HOPOUT from play store and app store and find people interested in the same activity.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *